acknowledge, admit


acknowledge, admit
One may acknowledge or admit an error. One may acknowledge or admit being in error. Thus, these words have approximately the same meaning,"to concede, grant, or declare something to be true." Acknowledge, however, is preferable when referring to a statement made reluctantly, especially one previously denied: "The bank teller acknowledged his error." Admit suggests the presence of force, duress, or pressure: "The culprit admitted the crime."

Dictionary of problem words and expressions. . 1975.

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  • acknowledge — 1 Acknowledge, admit, own, avow, confess are synonymous when they mean to disclose something against one’s will or inclination. All usually imply some sort of pressure as that of the law or of conscience leading to the disclosure. Acknowledge or… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • acknowledge — acknowledgeable, adj. acknowledger, n. /ak nol ij/, v.t., acknowledged, acknowledging. 1. to admit to be real or true; recognize the existence, truth, or fact of: to acknowledge one s mistakes. 2. to show or express recognition or realization of …   Universalium

  • acknowledge — ac•knowl•edge [[t]ækˈnɒl ɪdʒ[/t]] v. t. edged, edg•ing 1) to admit to be real or true; recognize the existence, truth, or fact of 2) to show or express recognition or realization of: to acknowledge applause by nodding[/ex] 3) to recognize the… …   From formal English to slang

  • acknowledge — transitive verb ( edged; edging) Etymology: ac (as in accord) + knowledge Date: 15th century 1. to recognize the rights, authority, or status of 2. to disclose knowledge of or agreement with 3. a. to …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • acknowledge — See acknowledge, admit …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • acknowledge — ac·knowl·edge vt edged, edg·ing 1: to indicate recognition and acceptance of the power of taxation in the general and state governments is acknowledged to be concurrent McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. 316 (1819) 2 a: to show by word or act that… …   Law dictionary

  • admit — ad·mit vb ad·mit·ted, ad·mit·ting vt 1: to concede as true or valid: make an admission of 2: to allow to be entered or offered admitted the document into evidence admit a will to probate vi: to make acknowledgment …   Law dictionary

  • acknowledge — ac*knowl edge ([a^]k*n[o^]l [e^]j), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {acknowledged} ([a^]k*n[o^]l [e^]jd); p. pr. & vb. n. {acknowledging} ([a^]k*n[o^]l [e^]j*[i^]ng).] [Prob. fr. pref. a + the verb knowledge. See {Knowledge}, and cf. {Acknow}.] 1. To own or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • acknowledge — [ak näl′ij, əknäl′ij] vt. acknowledged, acknowledging [earlier aknowledge < ME knowlechen < knowleche (see KNOWLEDGE): infl. by ME aknowen < OE oncnawan, to understand, know, with Latinized prefix] 1. to admit to be true or as stated;… …   English World dictionary

  • admit — 1. Admit of is now only used in the meaning ‘to allow as possible, leave room for’ (always with an abstract object: The circumstances will not admit of delay / It seems to admit of so many interpretations), and even here the construction seems… …   Modern English usage